Gardening

Vinegar in garden plant

Vinegar in garden plant


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Vinegar in garden plant care, plant pests and plant disease, and to treat various plants, in particular plants with leaf, fruit or stem injury,

to disinfect wounds, for example on animals, in surgery, and for treating surgical instruments and instruments for eye surgery,

to disinfect surgical wounds, wounds or burns in animal and human bodies, and to treat surgical wounds in animal and human bodies, for example during re-skinning,

for cleaning or disinfecting dentures, mouth, face and eyes of humans,

for cleaning and disinfecting items and articles such as glassware, porcelain, ceramics and kitchenware, furniture, clothing (including medical and hospital wear), pet grooming products, paper and cardboard,

for disinfecting foodstuffs, such as raw meat, fish, fruit juices and milk,

for preserving foodstuffs and for tenderising food,

for sanitising swimming pools, water based activities and water treatment equipment,

for preparing and storing food, feed, drink and materials of various kinds for use in industry and medicine,

for treating or preventing diseases in human beings or animals, and for destroying pathogens in order to make environments safe,

in the area of cosmetics, for example for treating skin infections, acne, wounds, scars, hair and nails, or as a shaving aid.

In general, for all of the abovementioned purposes, it is desirable to use an effective amount of triclosan, particularly 0.1 to 0.5%, preferably 0.1 to 0.2%, and more preferably 0.12 to 0.2%, by weight of the composition.

The compositions herein may also contain other active agents, for example anti-fungal agents, antimicrobial agents, insecticidal agents, herbicidal agents, fungicidal agents and insecticidal agents.

The following examples illustrate the invention:

All the temperatures and parts are given in degrees Celsius and parts by weight. The compositions were prepared as follows.

4% aqueous gellan solution was prepared as follows. The appropriate amount of gellan was weighed into a 250ml wide-mouth reactor, covered with an aluminium seal, hermetically closed and autoclaved at 121° C. for 20 minutes. When the solution had cooled to 85° C., 4% trisodium citrate solution was added, to the extent that the solution remained below its solubility at 75° C., and the mixture stirred until the temperature reached 85° C. The solution was then filtered through Whatman paper, the residual liquor centrifuged and the gellan solution extracted from the filter.

A solution of 1% triclosan was prepared by first dissolving one part of triclosan in 3 parts by weight of methylene chloride, and then adding 9 parts of a 50% aqueous solution of citric acid.

4% aqueous tetracycline solution was prepared as follows. An aqueous solution of tetracycline hydrochloride was made by adding 0.5 g of tetracycline hydrochloride to 250 ml of water. The pH of the solution was adjusted to 8.5 by the addition of sodium hydroxide.

A 1% triclosan/2% gellan composition was prepared by adding 1 ml of the gellan solution to the contents of a 250 ml wide-mouth reactor. 4% aqueous triclosan solution was added to the extent that the solution remained below its solubility at 75° C.

A composition of 1% triclosan and 1% quaternary ammonium halide was prepared as follows. 1 ml of triclosan solution was added to the contents of a 250 ml wide-mouth reactor. After the solution had cooled to 25° C. a further 1 ml of triclosan solution was added, and then 1 ml of a 25% quaternary ammonium halide solution was added to the extent that the solution remained below its solubility at 25° C.

Quaternary ammonium halide is defined as a tetraalkyl ammonium halide and includes tetramethylammonium chloride, tetraethylammonium chloride, tetramethylammonium bromide, tetraethylammonium bromide, and tetraethylammonium iodide.

Preparation of a triclosan composition in which the molar ratio of the quaternary ammonium to the hydrophobic cation is 1.3 to 3.0 was prepared by adding 0.5 ml of a 25% aqueous solution of the quaternary ammonium halide to the contents of a 250 ml wide-mouth reactor. The solution was allowed to stand at 25° C. for 2 hours, and was then further diluted with water to give a quaternary ammonium chloride concentration of 5 to 6.5%.

Preparation of a quaternary ammonium halide composition in which the molar ratio of the hydrophobic cation to the anion is 0.8 to 1.5 was prepared by adding 1.5 ml of a 0.2 to 0.5% aqueous solution of the anion to the contents of a 250 ml wide-mouth reactor. The solution was allowed to stand at 25° C.for 2 hours, and was then further diluted with water to give a quaternary ammonium chloride concentration of 4 to 7%.

The triclosan compositions of the present invention were prepared by adding 10 to 25 g of the triclosan composition of the present invention to a 100 to 200 liter wide-mouth reactor. The reactor was heated at 100 to 110° C. with a stirrer at 60 to 90 rpm. 1 to 2 ml of the quaternary ammonium chloride composition of the present invention or 1 to 2 ml of the monomer composition of the present invention was added to the contents of the reactor and the solution was left for 1 hour to 5 days. The resulting composition was then washed with about 1 liter of an aqueous solution having a pH of about 5.

Efficacy Test

The cationic surfactant compositions of the present invention are extremely effective as cationic surfactants in hair washing compositions. The compositions of the present invention provide superior foaming, conditioning, emulsifying, and rinsing characteristics without undue foaming, while exhibiting good lathering and surfactant properties, particularly at lower water temperatures.

The cationic surfactant compositions of the present invention provide superior foaming, conditioning, emulsifying, and rinsing characteristics while exhibiting good lathering and surfactant properties, particularly at lower water temperatures. To test these qualities, compositions were prepared containing 50 weight percent of the cationic surfactant composition of the present invention, 30 weight percent of a typical nonionic surfactant and 20 weight percent of distilled water, as described in the EXAMPLE below. The pH of the compositions was adjusted to about 5 by addition of HCl or NaOH. The pH of the compositions was measured with a model pH meter equipped with an ORION electrode. The pH values for the compositions with a pH value of 7 were less than about 7. For example, a composition comprising 75 weight percent of the cationic surfactant composition of the present invention, 15 weight percent of a nonionic surfactant and 10 weight percent of distilled water exhibited a pH of about 5.8.

The compositions were subjected to a lathering test. To determine whether the compositions were adequately lathering, the amount of foam generated was measured.



Comments:

  1. Zulkilmaran

    Sorry, liquidated

  2. Phorcys

    At me a similar situation. We will consider.

  3. Brockley

    I hope everything is fine

  4. Bralar

    Would like to tell to steam of words.



Write a message