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Rain garden planter box

Rain garden planter box



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Do something different with boring downpipes! Stormwater planters can be used at the base of a downpipe or rain chain as an aesthetic solution to managing the flow of rainwater. They help to reduce flash flooding by slowing the flow and can form part of a sustainable drainage system SuDS. Watch this project come to life - a Torricelli tube downpipe, a water wheel, and three stormwater planters outflowing to a rain garden. My rainwall project design and build for Preshute Primary School in Manton, Wilts, features wiggly downpipes, with hoppers as planters, rain chains and clear sections to allow the flow of rainwater to be observed. These stormwater planters are made from cattle troughs and slow the flow of rainwater.

Content:
  • Rain Gardens
  • Stormwater Solutions
  • Building a raingarden: step-by-step guide
  • How to create a rain garden
  • Rain Garden Planters
  • Metal Downspout Planters
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: How to Build a Rain Garden - Utilise Rainwater and Prevent Flooding

Rain Gardens

Rain gardens in their simplest form are shallow depressions with absorbent, yet free draining soil and planted with vegetation that can withstand temporary flooding.

They are generally self-watering, low maintenance gardens designed to protect our waterways and lakes by capturing stormwater which runs off hard surfaces after it rains. They also mimic the natural water retention of undeveloped land and reduce the volume of rainwater running off into drains from impervious surfaces surfaces that fluids, like water, cannot pass through.

They also treat low level pollution and nutrients in stormwater by using physical processes in the soil and biological properties of plants, roots and microbes. You can download printable content on this and much more on our Fact sheets, videos and more page. A rain garden lets water collect and settle on the garden surface then soak through the plants and filter soil.

Rubbish and sediment is trapped on the surface. Nutrients dissolved in the rainwater are used by the plants. The soil and plant roots work together to naturally filter the water and remove pollutants.

It is important that the soil used is correct to let plants grow and hold moisture but also allow infiltration. There are many types of rain gardens:. This type of rain garden is positioned above the ground to collect stormwater from a diverted roof downpipe, allowing stormwater to filter through the rain garden before connecting to the stormwater system. This type of rain garden is positioned in the ground to collect stormwater from hard surfaces or a diverted roof downpipe, allowing stormwater to filter through the rain garden before connecting to the stormwater system.

This type of rain garden is positioned in the ground to collect stormwater from hard surfaces or a diverted roof downpipe, allowing stormwater to filter through the rain garden and penetrate into the surrounding soil.

A slight depression in the landscape which can be either grassed or planted with other vegetation. When a roof downpipe diverts rainwater through a hose via a d-shape mechanism, allowing water to soak into the garden and surrounding soil. A permeable material, often brick like, that allows water to penetrate through into the surrounding soil.

Similar to a downpipe diversion only the d-shape mechanism is fitted to the overflow of the rainwater tank.

A vegetable rain garden is sub-irrigated, which means the water enters at the base of the garden. This helps to prevent the vegetables being submerged after heavy rain and water is used more efficiently as there is less evaporation from the surface. Start by either constructing your planter box or excavating your trench, depending on the type of rain garden you've decided to build.

A waterproof liner is sometimes used around the outside of rain gardens when you need to:. If you're building an in-ground style rain garden including an in-ground and infiltration rain garden or swale , dig the area with a gentle slope away from the house.

A saturated zone or submerged zone below the rain garden is recommended to provide water storage to help plants survive during dry periods and help remove nitrogen. Note: a storage zone for water below the soil can support plants and improve treatment performance. This is especially useful in Canberra where there can be extended dry periods. Be creative with your rain garden design using a variety of plants, rather than one species.

This will prevent die-off and weeds. Mulch your rain garden with gravel to keep the moisture in.Avoid using bark or straw mulch as it will float and wash back into the stormwater system. Your local nursery can guide you on what plants are suitable for your area. When choosing plants for your rain garden make sure they're able to tolerate heavy rainfall with temporary flooding as well as long dry periods. Native plants are usually more drought resistant and easier to maintain than introduced species.

It provides specific advice on the right plants for your garden to conserve water, avoid overwatering and fertilising and benefit our waterways. Rain gardens are easy to maintain, especially when planted with native Australian plants. They don't need to be watered, mowed or fertilised. Follow these simple tips to make sure your rain garden functions well. If it doesn't rain, water your rain garden until your plants have established in compliance with local water restrictions.

The easiest and cheapest way to build a rain garden is to do it yourself. The materials you need can be purchased from most hardware or garden supply stores. You could also contact an professional landscape gardener to help you build your rain garden and provide advice.

A licensed plumber can assist you with any modifications and diversions to your stormwater pipes. Melbourne Water - Raingardens. Skip to content. Accessibility Contact Us. ACT Healthy Waterways.

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How healthy is our water? Home Home What can I do? Rain gardens and stormwater. How do rain gardens work? There are many types of rain gardens: Planter box This type of rain garden is positioned above the ground to collect stormwater from a diverted roof downpipe, allowing stormwater to filter through the rain garden before connecting to the stormwater system. In-ground This type of rain garden is positioned in the ground to collect stormwater from hard surfaces or a diverted roof downpipe, allowing stormwater to filter through the rain garden before connecting to the stormwater system.

Infiltration This type of rain garden is positioned in the ground to collect stormwater from hard surfaces or a diverted roof downpipe, allowing stormwater to filter through the rain garden and penetrate into the surrounding soil. Swale A slight depression in the landscape which can be either grassed or planted with other vegetation. Downpipe diversion When a roof downpipe diverts rainwater through a hose via a d-shape mechanism, allowing water to soak into the garden and surrounding soil.

Porous paving A permeable material, often brick like, that allows water to penetrate through into the surrounding soil. Rainwater tank diversion Similar to a downpipe diversion only the d-shape mechanism is fitted to the overflow of the rainwater tank. Vegetable A vegetable rain garden is sub-irrigated, which means the water enters at the base of the garden. A waterproof liner is sometimes used around the outside of rain gardens when you need to: protect nearby buildings, foundations or infrastructure avoid creating problems with saline groundwater or reactive clays capture all stormwater for reuse.

Check the base of the rain garden is above the surrounding groundwater level. Design your rain garden to treat stormwater runoff from gentle rainfall. Runoff from heavy storms should bypass the rain garden into the drainage system. Rain garden plants Be creative with your rain garden design using a variety of plants, rather than one species. Tips for a healthy rain garden Rain gardens are easy to maintain, especially when planted with native Australian plants.

Cover your rain garden with gravel mulch to retain moisture. Weed your rain garden until the plants have matured. Evenly distribute water flow into your rain garden to limit erosion from heavy rainfall. Strategically placed rocks may help with this. Inspect your rain garden — replace plants and repair erosion in your rain garden when necessary. Don't drive over or squash your rain garden as this will reduce its ability to work effectively. Need help building your rain garden? Other useful resources Melbourne Water - Raingardens Actsmart.

Planter box This type of rain garden is positioned above the ground to collect stormwater from a diverted roof downpipe, allowing stormwater to filter through the rain garden before connecting to the stormwater system.


Stormwater Solutions

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Rain gardens can be created in a variety of ways including downpipe diversion, a green roof, in-ground, planter box, tank diversion.

Building a raingarden: step-by-step guide

Our gardens love rain and, after the warmer, dryer months, appreciate the healthy refreshment. However, when rain is heavy and accompanied by winds, it can be potentially harmful and ruin the hard work we have put into our borders throughout spring and summer. Follow these tips to protect your garden before, during and after a downpour Remove damaged shoots and limbs. Before a rain storm, remove any dead shoots and limbs from your plants to make them as streamline as possible and reduce the risk of snapping and tangling. Support taller plants. Heavy rain can put taller, less secure plants through their paces, especially when combined with strong winds. Push a wooden or metal support into the ground and gently tie the plant to it. This will protect it from the physical damage and prevent it from snapping. To avoid water collecting in a pool anywhere in your garden and potentially drowning the nearby plants, make sure there is adequate drainage.

How to create a rain garden

Beyond providing nutrition and beautifying spaces, gardens can serve many purposes, such as supporting natural processes and pollinators. Rain gardens are a type of specialty garden that help protect our waterways by managing stormwater runoff. Below are some tips from our colleagues over at the New York League of Conservation Voters on how to establishing a rain garden in your yard! Rain gardens help capture, absorb, and filter rainwater, and are a type of green infrastructure, or a natural technique for managing rainwater runoff.

Planter boxes are urban rain gardens with vertical walls and either open or closed bottoms. They collect and absorb runoff from sidewalks, parking lots, and streets and are ideal for space-limited sites in dense urban areas.

Rain Garden Planters

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Metal Downspout Planters

Bioretention areas, or rain gardens, are landscaping features adapted to provide on-site capture and treatment of stormwater runoff. They are commonly located in parking lot islands or within small pockets of residential land. The surface stormwater runoff is directed into the shallow, vegetated depressions, which increase stormwater storage, filtration, and pollutant reduction. These bioretention depression areas are designed to mimic many of the pollutant removal mechanisms that operate in natural ecosystems. During storm events, stormwater runoff travels as sheet flow or via a curb cut to the bioretention treatment area, which usually consists of a grass buffer strip, sand bed, ponding area, organic layer or mulch layer, planting soil, and plants.

When built in a planter box, a vegetable raingarden can be positioned to collect roof water from a diverted downpipe. Building a raingarden.

Rainwater is best for watering your garden, but too much rain is hard on your soil and your plants. I was watching the morning news the other day, and the weatherman said we had rain 15 days out of the lastIt rained again that day.

RELATED VIDEO: MSD Rain Garden and Planter Box Maintenance

Username or Email Address. Remember Me. When rain falls on natural, vegetated areas such as a forest it is filtered by soil and plants and allowed to soak back into the ground. When rain falls on hard, impervious surfaces such as rooftops and roads it cannot soak into the ground and becomes stormwater runoff. Stormwater runoff picks up pollution such as mud chemicals and litter, carries them into stormwater drains and out into our waterways.

Downspout planters are landscaped planter boxes that capture rain water from the roof and function in a similar way as a rain garden but instead within a container. These planters are often custom built and can be designed to complement the architecture and landscape of your home.

Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to seek, up and down arrows for volume. Prolonged droughts in southern Australia has meant there is less water available for home gardeners, both in terms of natural rainfall and because of water restrictions. Gardeners are looking at different ways to overcome this dire situation and to prevent their gardens from becoming a wasteland. One method is to build a rain garden. A rain garden is a system that collects water from paving, hard surfaces, roofs, and puts it through a filtering mechanism that removes nutrients and pollutants. The water can then be used to irrigate the garden or, can pass through the filtering system and be released into the drainage system.The great thing about a rain garden is that it maximises the amount of water that would otherwise just run off.

Rain gardens in their simplest form are shallow depressions with absorbent, yet free draining soil and planted with vegetation that can withstand temporary flooding. They are generally self-watering, low maintenance gardens designed to protect our waterways and lakes by capturing stormwater which runs off hard surfaces after it rains. They also mimic the natural water retention of undeveloped land and reduce the volume of rainwater running off into drains from impervious surfaces surfaces that fluids, like water, cannot pass through.